How to Make Modeling Chocolate from Scratch

modeling chocolate from scratchModeling chocolate, also known as chocolate clay, is used to decorate and cover cakes. It is also used as a sculpting material to form figures and shapes. If you love the appearance of fondant on your cakes but you don’t particularly like its taste, modeling chocolate is an alternative to look into. It tastes much better than fondant; after all it is made from chocolate!

Modeling chocolate is very versatile, and it should be part of every home baker or cake decorator’s arsenal. Its texture can be likened to that of a tootsie roll or a marzipan, and its shape is firm enough to hold its own, yet it is pliable enough to be molded into figurines and is very easy to work with.

You can buy pre-made modeling chocolate at any baking supplies stores, but it is very easy to make modeling chocolate from scratch, and you will only need two ingredients. You may use any kind of chocolate, from semi-sweet, bittersweet, milk, or white chocolate. You should take into consideration, though, that white chocolate should be used if you are going to color the modeling chocolate later on. It is highly recommended to start with less corn syrup and then add more as you go along, until you get the right consistency for a pliable modeling chocolate.

For a simple modeling paste recipe without the chocolate, click here.

What You Will Need:

  • 2 pounds of white chocolate
  • 1 cup of corn syrup

What You Have to Do:

  1. Finely chop the chocolates.
  2. Melt your chocolate in a microwave or a double boiler, making sure not to overheat the chocolate, so that it will not harden or burn.
  3. Heat the corn syrup in a microwave for about 30 seconds.
  4. Pour the heated corn syrup into your melted chocolate. Note that using less corn syrup yields to a firm modeling chocolate that is less elastic. On the other hand, adding a bit more corn syrup creates a softer and more pliable modeling chocolate from scratch.
  5. Stir the mixture using your spatula until there are no lumps. At this point, it is important not to overmix. Otherwise, you will end up with crumbly chocolate sitting at the bottom of your bowl, with the fat sitting at the top.
  6. Pour the mixture on a metal baking sheet.
  7. You can now knead the dough until the consistency becomes more pliable and silky. If the dough is too crumbly and dry, you can add a bit more of the corn syrup. If it’s too greasy, knead it in a cool surface to work the oil back into the chocolate.
  8. To color your modeling chocolate, knead in using a small amount of gel coloring, and continue to add until you achieve the color you want. If you end up putting too much color, add more of the white chocolate to lighten it.
  9. Allow it to set at room temperature for about one hour before you start modeling.
  10. For any modeling chocolate left over, you may store at room temperature, and it will be good for several months. Or you can transfer it in a freezer bag and store at your freezer to extend its life further.
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